Alice Takes Back Wonderland [Review]

Posted January 14, 2016 by Sophia Lin in Review / 1 Comment

Alice Takes Back Wonderland [Review]Alice Takes Back Wonderland by David D. Hammons
Published by Curiosity Quills Press on September 28th 2015
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Retelling
Pages: 283
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three-stars
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After ten years of being told she can't tell the difference between real life and a fairy tale, Alice finally stops believing in Wonderland. So when the White Rabbit shows up at her house, Alice thinks she's going crazy.
Only when the White Rabbit kicks her down the rabbit hole does Alice realize that the magical land she visited as a child is real.
But all is not well in Wonderland.
The Ace of Spades has taken over Wonderland and is systematically dismantling all that makes it wonderful. Plain is replacing wondrous, logical is replacing magical, and reason is destroying madness. Alice decides she must help the Mad Hatter and all those fighting to keep Wonderland wonderful.
But how can she face such danger when she is just a girl?
Alice must journey across the stars to unite an army. She discovers that fairy tales are real in the magical world beyond the rabbit hole. But they are not the fairy tales she knows.
Fairy tales have dangers and adventures of their own, and Alice must overcome the trials of these old stories if she wants to unite the lands against Ace.
With the help of Peter Pan, Pinocchio, Snow White and heroes old and new, Alice may have the strength to take back Wonderland.

Title: Alice Takes Back Wonderland
Author: David D. Hammons
Series: Standalone
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Retellings, Mythology
Pages: 238
Published By: Curiosity Quills Press on September 28, 2015
Challenges: None

**Review copy provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**

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After ten years of being told she can’t tell the difference between real life and a fairy tale, Alice finally stops believing in Wonderland. So when the White Rabbit shows up at her house, Alice thinks she’s going crazy.

Only when the White Rabbit kicks her down the rabbit hole does Alice realize that the magical land she visited as a child is real.

But all is not well in Wonderland.

The Ace of Spades has taken over Wonderland and is systematically dismantling all that makes it wonderful. Plain is replacing wondrous, logical is replacing magical, and reason is destroying madness. Alice decides she must help the Mad Hatter and all those fighting to keep Wonderland wonderful.

But how can she face such danger when she is just a girl?

Alice must journey across the stars to unite an army. She discovers that fairy tales are real in the magical world beyond the rabbit hole. But they are not the fairy tales she knows.

Fairy tales have dangers and adventures of their own, and Alice must overcome the trials of these old stories if she wants to unite the lands against Ace.

With the help of Peter Pan, Pinocchio, Snow White and heroes old and new, Alice may have the strength to take back Wonderland.

Q1. The stories are echoes, not trutch. Though there is some truth in them.

Q2. You will not want to fly downward while a lost boy stands below, Alice.

Q3. Alice: I’m going to have to everything I learned in my nursery.
Peter: That would be a tragedy.

Alice Takes Back Wonderland is one peculiar book – it took awhile for me to get into the story, but not bad overall (I’ve read worse).

The main character, Alice, is a little similar to Alyssa from Splintered – she talks to bugs and flowers, and they talk to her as well. And unlike Alyssa, who keeps her “ability” a secret, those around Alice assume she’s a nutcase – she’s been assumed to have schizophrenia along with ADHD. Alice also isn’t related to Wonderland Alice – she just ended up going down the rabbit hole at seven and came back a completely different person.

Years later, just when Alice thinks everything in Wonderland was an imagination, the White Rabbit appears again to bring Alice back to save Wonderland. There, Ace of Spades has taken over the land and has been trying to “humanize” the creatures by taking the wonder out of them, thus taking Alice back down the rabbit hole once more.

When Hammons introduces us to Wonderland and Alice tries to reunite with the creatures she met when she was seven, it’s really hard to get into the story (and at the beginning too – no fun). There’s a lot of nonsense going on in Wonderland with very little sense – I haven’t read Alice In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll myself, but I personally think Hammons did a pretty good job trying to capture the nonsensical aspect Carroll uses in the original story.

Now, in the case of getting me to read the story, however, I’m starting to think I should just call it off (much to Ella’s dismay).

As soon as Alice leaves Wonderland to recruit other kingdoms (fairy tales), on the other hand, the story becomes less nonsensical and more of something that I could fully comprehend and wrap my head around. (I got the gist of Wonderland – I did not understand what all the creatures were saying.) Hammons introduces us Peter Pan and the Lost Boys, Pinocchio, Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty – all recognizable in some way. But that’s not all the fairy tales involved.

Hammons also throws in heroes of myth and legend as well – people such as Joan the Ark, Hercules, King Arthur, Loki, etc. At that point, I pretty much took a step back (or almost) from the book. There are way too many tales involved in this battle to take back Wonderland and stop the Ace of Spades from taking the wonder out of everyone. Those characters don’t play a major role like Peter Pan, Pinocchio, Snow White, and all the ones mentioned earlier, so it’s less confusing. I just think Hammons should have kept it strictly at fairy tales rather than all of them.

(I’ll give him this: all of them are individual kingdoms instead of mushed together into one. Less confusing.)

To make it worse, most of the characters also play multiple roles, which I won’t say because I might spoil something. But still – too much myth and legend is mentioned in this vast world Hammons creates.

Overall, not bad for a book that takes far too many tales into its plot. It takes some time to get used to the story, but once you get past Wonderland’s bit of remaining nonsense and enter Neverland and the Grimm Kingdom, the story has an adventure or two as Alice learns that maybe fairy tales aren’t as literal as they seem.

 

Let’s talk about it!
Did you read Alice Takes Back Wonderland? Or any of David’s other books? What did you think of them? Leave your thoughts in the comments! 🙂

 

three-stars
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